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> > > Chris Fonseca: So Beautiful Choreography

18 March 2014

photo of a young man wearing a white shirt and tie, smiling as he looks at a text on a mobile phone

Still from Chris Fonseca's dance for film: 'So Beautiful'

Chris Fonseca's debut dance video was created with the lyrics to 'So Beautiful' by Musiq SoulChild in mind. Melissa Mostyn asks what makes this piece of romantic choreography unique?

So Beautiful is exactly as the title describes. An aesthetically pleasing, easy-on-the-eye choreographed piece, for the first two-and-a-half minutes you do not realise the dancer is deaf - that is, until he turns his head in close-up and pauses. Other than that, it's just some guy who could be chilling out on a Sunday, texting a loved one in bed surrounded by a collection of vintage watches and washing his face before he gets into his moves. 

And what moves they are. Minimal, yet precise and idiosyncratic, they could not belong to anyone but Chris Fonseca, who performs them. This is not a video targeted specifically at Deaf audiences. You need to be a member of the Deaf Community to know who Semhar Beyene, the female co-dancer who appears at Chris' front door three minutes in, is. 

Why is this important? Can Deaf people not dance? Of course they can - Beyene is one of a number of accomplished Deaf dancers who can adapt well to whatever pop-music routines they're asked to deliver.

But this is where So Beautiful deviates from the Deaf Community norm. Within ghettoised communities, it is not unusual for members to emulate mainstream pop stars - Michael Jackson, Justin Timberlake - in their performances, and in that respect, the Deaf Community is no different. Groups like Def Motion and X-Factor-alike sign-karaoke contests are devised for the exact purpose of entertaining their Deaf audiences, who enthusiastically lap up every second (and long may that continue). 

Rare, however, is the opportunity to watch a well-crafted routine like Chris Fonseca's, and feel that it came from him alone. 

Of course, skilful film direction and editing plays a vital role in the presentation of So Beautiful, and the discovery that the work was done by none other than Bim Ajadi, a consummate Deaf film director, made me smile.

Although he is credited at the end, downplaying Ajadi's involvement is a clever strategy that reinforces the sense that So Beautiful is a dance video that has moved out of the ghetto; the twist being, it gives Ajadi scope for more creative freedom too. This is not intended as a slight on his more Deaf-orientated work. Rather, he should be allowed to work outside the ghetto if he so chooses.

It's been pointed out by Dao's editor that as an art form, dance allows more room for manoeuvre in terms of presentation of identity - often making it hard to tell if the work is coming out of the experience of marginalization, unless it's encoded within the artist's practice. 

I'd say that especially applies to the Deaf Community. Precious little deaf access to professional dance training, coupled with a proliferation of pop-music videos and DVDs since the 1980s, ensures that those within the Deaf Community seek out easier ways to learn to dance, but sometimes incline towards sheer mimicry due to the challenges of practising moving in tune. This often results in them emulating well-known routines with a degree of quiet, intense concentration that you don't get with hearing dancers, who ironically tend to show more facial expression in the duration.

In contrast, the ease with which Chris Fonseca shifts and twists his body in So Beautiful is as if he's slipped on his own dancing shoes without realising it. If he removed his CI processor before the film began, how would I know he was deaf? 

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