This site now acts as an archive only. For the latest news, opinion, blogs and listings on disability arts and culture visit disabilityarts.online.

Disability Arts Online

Combining traditional painting techniques with digital manipulation / 9 March 2015

The dry stone wall and writing in this image come from a derelict barn, I allow them to appear translucent within this Derbyshire landscape with its dramatic sky.

Alan Hopwood: 'TOXIC' 2013 Digital print

Zoom in to this image and read text description

I am a visual artist who has studied Fine Art at Masters’ Degree level as well as lecturing in Fine art for some 12 years. In 2014, my muscular skeletal condition escalated to such a level that I had to stop work and register myself as disabled. Since then I have been, as we all do, finding a life balance that enables me to manage my condition whilst still having some fulfilment and family life.

In the Autumn I was able to find a small space to use as a studio, and now, as and when I am able, I get to paint and be creative, finally doing the thing that I studied for all those years ago.

This has proven to be a very positive stage for me, after an initial low after stopping full time work, I have settled into a good routine that allows me to balance my pain levels and still be productive as an artist.

I have my first solo exhibition on (until 15th April ’15) at The Landscape Gallery in Market Harborough, and I am taking part in a group show at the Atkins Gallery in Hinckley Leicestershire from the 13th March.

I have also just been accepted into the Leicester Society of Artists (LSA) so it has been a busy month.

Anyway, that's the score so far, I would rather talk about what informs my painting, both in subject, concept and creation.

I use a wide variety of images that explore the diverse outlooks people have across the UK, from picturesque countryside to city streets. I find aesthetic interest in all sorts of things, and I often use elements of graffiti, peeling paint and litter alongside more traditional landscape subjects.

I aim to explore my own emotions through my work and hope that this also engages others and connects to their experiences too. As I have lived in various towns, cities and villages across the UK, my work also celebrates the social and cultural diversity found within our country.

"TOXIC" 2013  Digital print stems from conceptual ideas about emotions, and I hope it serves as an introduction into my thought process and visual language. I use traditional painting techniques in mixed media as well as digital manipulation to create the works, sometimes both methods in the same piece.

Keywords: landscape painting,visual arts

Comments

Mike Crawford

/
14 March 2015

Hi, Alan,

Just to say that I'm also a trained artist who is disabled, so I relate to much what you are saying.

Love your work and look forward to seeing and reading more.

All the best.

Mikey

Alan Hopwood

/
11 March 2015

Hi Colin, even my Digital images started life as traditional paintings, I scan them and then work on them using Photoshop. sometimes they get re-printed, painted back into and re-scanned. Merging the painted image with other images is a common process of mine, it allows fine tuning and contrasting textures.

I have linked an image which I think shows the process clearly, titled "Loading bay" 2013

Ron Moule

/
11 March 2015

Great to see new members and new work. I particularly like Alan's writing,combining sone life story and development with accoibts of his work.

Like Colin I am also interested in the technical aspects: they can shed light on technique and perhaps inspire others.

Colin Hambrook

/
11 March 2015

Good luck with it all Alan! It sound like you are having a busy month. Love the distressed feel of ‘Toxic’ - am intrigued as to whether you achieved that using a palette knife or a photoshop filter?

Add a comment

Please leave your comments. They will display when submitted. DAO encourages critical feedback, but please be considerate. DAO reserves the right to edit or remove comments that don't comply with our editorial policy, which you can find on DAOs 'About' pages.

Your e-mail address will not be revealed to the public.
HTML is forbidden, but line-breaks will be retained.
This can be a URL of an image or a YouTube, MySpaceTV or a Flickr page (we'll handle the media embedding from there!)
This is to prevent automatic submissions.